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Author Topic: 240V from 120V  (Read 5939 times)
homey
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« on: February 02, 2012, 11:04:39 PM »

A friend of a friend has this expensive amplifier that he would like to put in His system  It is a Pathos TT tube/mosfet hybrid (retails well over $5k)

Problem is it is wired for 240 volt 50 HERTZ.    & the only wiring that He has anywhere close to where the amp will be going is 120Volt 60 HERTZ.  so He asked Me if
I could hook up some kind of transformer to boost the voltage to 240V...... & Is said........ I Don't think so!    How the hell can I get 50 hertz in America?
The amp is made in Italy (I think),  So,  It would be a big deal having the Amp rewired for American voltage.

I thought I would check with the Hornshoppe groupies.....& see what y'all think.   

From what I read on the net....  This amp is a nice one.   Maybe I should tell Him to sale It,  & buy a pair of Beastettes & a pair of heiled Horns.
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homey
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« Reply #1 on: February 02, 2012, 11:10:26 PM »

here is a link to the Pathos Amplifier......   http://www.pathosacoustics.com/indexeng.htm            ( It is the model TT  )

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Pit Hinder
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« Reply #2 on: February 03, 2012, 01:10:55 AM »

Homey, the voltage isn´t the problem - the mains frequency is. A transformer wound for our European 59Hz will hum sound of home when fed your 60.
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Capt. Z
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« Reply #3 on: February 03, 2012, 11:49:17 AM »

I've moved continent a few times with my stereo stuff. All of my equipment can internally be reconnected between 120 and 240. Never had an issue with the 50 or 60 Hz.

May check with the manufacturer if the amp can internally be re-wired.

Or ask a technician to look inside at the transformer.

Or you could open up the amp and post a picture of the transformer with the power leads.
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Ed Schilling
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« Reply #4 on: February 04, 2012, 10:20:04 AM »

Homey, don't know about that amp but the p/s I use in the Truth is good for either freq. or voltage, or so they say. I can only run them on 240/ 60hz but the ones I've sent over there seem to be fine. Except for Capt Zs',  his has a mechanical hum from the xformer but I "think" it was here too. Pit may be right as well......contact Pathos if possible.

Sure hope you can make it this May!
Ed
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Pit Hinder
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« Reply #5 on: February 04, 2012, 10:29:14 AM »

 Roll Eyes No, I was wrong. €land runs on 50 Hz, not 59 - I´m an excellent typoist.
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Capt. Z
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« Reply #6 on: February 04, 2012, 11:54:51 AM »

Your right Ed. The mechanical noise from the transformer was about the same in the USA as I hear now in the UK.

Still, don't want to be without my Truth.
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steve f
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« Reply #7 on: February 04, 2012, 01:28:42 PM »

Homey,

I'm thinking along your last suggestion. Beastettes, Heil Horns, can't go wrong.

Capt. Z,

Have you tried taking out the Truth's tranny, tightened things up evenly, and remounted it? Transformer noise is so damned irritating.

Steve
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Capt. Z
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« Reply #8 on: February 04, 2012, 02:21:41 PM »

Hey Steve;

Have tried tightening everything, even put some Dynamat stuff inside the housing, since the housing picked up the mechanical hum and 'amplified' it. Thinking about placing something between transformer and housing, but have not opened up the Truth for a long time. Kinda got used the the low level hum.
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homey
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« Reply #9 on: February 04, 2012, 02:40:00 PM »

the diff in freq. is what I was not sure of,    a search produced a mixed bag of results  (doesn't it always lol)  such as this one:  What happens to a 220v 50hz stereo amplifier when connected to a 220v 60hz supply?

What happens to a 220v 50hz stereo amplifier when connected to a 220v 60hz supply?

  

Answer

Nothing happens. The stereo has a transformer that converts the power to DC, and 50 or 60 Hz input makes no difference.

Read more: http://wiki.answers.com
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Pit Hinder
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« Reply #10 on: February 04, 2012, 02:55:19 PM »

Homey, there *is* a difference. Energy transfer (electric to magnetic and back, in this case) is not lossless. Part of the energy stays magnetic and makes the thing vibrate. Stupid explanation, but German to American isn´t lossless either.
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steve f
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« Reply #11 on: February 05, 2012, 10:29:17 AM »

Since I've never had the chance to play with one, what type of power transformer is used in the truth?

Steve
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2wo
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« Reply #12 on: February 08, 2012, 05:29:30 PM »

Connecting the transformer to 60Hz rather than 50Hz, actually has less of a chance of vibrating. 60Hz is slightly more efficient at equal voltage. It's a rate of change thing. Anyway 220V 60Hz will work just fine...John   
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"...there was a knock on the door and a voice shouted "Alcohol, Tobacco and Firearms" and I thought it was a delivery"
Pit Hinder
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« Reply #13 on: February 08, 2012, 07:28:03 PM »

John, I have no idea why Europe upped from 220V to 240 but stayed at 50Hz. My guess is, someones friends can keep selling cheaper trannies at the same price. Money talks, over here. Cry
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homey
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« Reply #14 on: February 14, 2012, 11:41:36 AM »

So It looks like operating a 60 hz designed Amp on a 50 hz system (Europe, etc) will definitely NOT work.  But,  a 50 hz. Amp "should" work (in most cases) on
a 60 hz system (America).    at least that is the general consensus observed on many guitar Amplifier forums.......

AN EXAMPLE................


  

Guitar Amp Universe » Electric Guitar Amp » 60/50Hz line freq thoughts.
60/50Hz line freq thoughts.
Question:

> Hi, >    I’m living in Ireland. I want to buy a secondhand amp from America over > the internet as the prices are much cheaper. The only problem is that the > electricity runs at different speeds in America to Ireland/England. What > can I do about this? > Live Forever, >              Dafydd.

Hello there Dafydd, You’ve got the 50 cent question, here’s a 50 cent answer…  Things to be concerned with when changing locations: Voltage differences Line frequency of the new location Grounded outlets Powersupply considerations. Real quick, some thoughts.  The amplifier should have a voltage selector switch on the rear pannel, if not you’ll need some type of voltage conversion, ie step up/step down transformer. Don’t use a variac although some people do. With the change in line frequency, the power transformer(s) operation should be looked into. Some transformers will burn up when the line frequency changes as they were designed for a single specific market and were cheaper for the mfgr to buy. Chances are the voltage multi tap/selector equiped amplifiers will cover the line frequency change, but a check with the mfgr would do no harm. In general, English amplifiers will cross over to the US as the line frequency increases over here and the filter caps will filter the B+ ripple in most cases. The larger portion of any problems appear when US amps are moved into the 50Hz power sources. Not all US amplifiers will cross over to the 50Hz market directly. Although the voltage taps on the xmfr can be set, the original filter caps supplied might not be adequate to properly filter the B+. If the transformer will handle the 50Hz and new voltage source, listen for objectional hum from the speaker, better yet have the ripple measured under load by a qualified tech. Also keep a close watch on the temp of the power transformer in hard operation. Being carefull to ensure a grounded amp is always a must. I measured the ground-neutral at a "south of the boarder location" in June and found the ground at about 30 volts. It kept triping my ground fault indicators off. No one likes to kiss those hot mics… Again, the transformer should be rated for both line frequencies, but sometimes is not. The temp of a tranformer is also a good indication that the power factor is out of line and should be dealt with. If your amplifier has an adequate transformer, but lacks the proper amount of power supply filtering, the value of the filter caps can often be increased as a "fix" for most people who wish to remain in the 50Hz areas. The capacitors could remain in upon changing back to 60Hz operation. hope that helps cheers Skip  
« Last Edit: February 14, 2012, 11:43:42 AM by homey » Logged
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